From London’s most trusted cleaning company

Looking for a cleaning company in London? Look no further.

Offering a wide range of professional cleaning services, we’re extremely proud of our large number of unsolicited positive reviews and excellent customer service.

Trusted Cleaners offer the following cleaning services in London:

  • End of tenancy cleaning
  • Pre tenancy cleaning
  • One off deep clean / Spring clean
  • After party quick clean
  • Overnight deep clean
  • After builders cleaning.
  • Carpet cleaning services
  • Weekly clean / Stay tidy
  • Fast track service available

Choosing the right cleaning company

It goes without saying there is no shortage of cleaning companies in London. A google search returns over 18 million results.

Choosing the wrong cleaning company for a service like tenancy cleaning can result in deposit deductions and unexpected costs further down the line.

For specialist cleaning services, like deep cleaning, we’re so confident about the quality of our work we offer a full guarantee. It really is as simple as that.

  • We use professional cleaners and offer you 100% satisfaction
  • Feel completely safe all our staff are security vetted
  • We are fully insured giving you complete peace of mind
  • Call us or Request a call back for a free no obligation quote

Quality Vs. Cheap

Quality is at the heart of what we do. Our focus is on delivering consistently high quality cleaning services while offering value for money.

We often tell our customers picking the right cleaning company for the job is very important. We’re aware that price can be an deciding factor in your decision making process, naturally, but remember you often pay for what you get.

We regularly spot check and carry out quality assurance to maintain the high standards expected of us.

By paying our cleaners well above the minimum wage they are motivated to turn up to work on time and deliver the high quality cleaning services we have become associated with.

Interesting fact about Surrey

  • Originally an area attached to the Kingdom of the Middle Saxons (Middlesex), the name Surrey itself derives from ‘the southern region’.
  • Guildford is named after a ford of golden sand just south of the town – it was dredged in 1760 when the river was deepened to make it navigable for barges up as far as Godalming.
  • The name Godalming itself, meanwhile, comes from the area belonging to ‘Godhelm’s people’. This Godhelm was, according to local legend, a fierce and bloodthirsty English pagan warrior.
  • Originally a collection of houses, inns and shops for the civilian relatives and tradesmen who served the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, Camberley was once named Cambridge Town, after the Duke of Cambridge. Local authorities eventually renamed it, however, after tiring of confusion with the university town.
  • The three most popular street names in Surrey are High Street, Church Road and Station Road.
  • Bagshot Heath was once reputedly the most dangerous place in England – all because of the activities of a particularly cool, violent and careful highwayman called The Golden Farmer who operated there from about 1647 to 1689.
  • Mary Frith (more famously known as Moll Cutpurse), one of the few highwaywomen on record, also robbed on the heaths of north Surrey.
  • In 1540, King Henry VIII annulled his marriage to Anne of Cleves. Anne’s family didn’t want her back, so Henry was left with the problem of what to do with her. Then he hit on the idea of making her his ‘sister’ and building Oatlands Palace for her in Weybridge.
  • Farnham’s favourite son William Cobbett – the pub he was born in, in 1783, is named in his honour – was sent to prison in 1810 for seditious libel, but continued his political writings and agitations from prison.
  • There has only been one Duke of Surrey, Thomas Holland, who lived in the 1300s, and he came to such a sticky end that nobody seems to have wanted to follow him in the title.

Some Surrey History

After the Battle of Hastings, the Norman army advanced through Kent into Surrey, where they defeated an English force which attacked them at Southwark, before proceeding westwards on a circuitous march to reach London from the north-west. As was the case across England, the native ruling class of Surrey was virtually eliminated by Norman seizure of land. Only one significant English landowner, the brother of the last English Abbot of Chertsey, remained by the time the Domesday survey was conducted in 1086. At that time the largest landholding in Surrey, as in many other parts of the country, was the expanded royal estate, while the next largest holding belonged to Richard fitz Gilbert, founder of the de Clare family.

Runnymede, where the Magna Carta was sealed

In 1088, King William II granted William de Warenne the title of Earl of Surrey as a reward for Warenne’s loyalty during the rebellion that followed the death of William I. When the male line of the Warennes became extinct in the 14th century the earldom was inherited by the Fitzalan Earls of Arundel. The Fitzalan line of Earls of Surrey became extinct in 1415 but the title was revived in the late 15th century for the Howard family who still hold it. However, Surrey was not the principal focus of any of these families’ interests.

Guildford Castle, one of many fortresses originally established by the Normans as part of the process of subjugating the country, was developed as a royal palace in the 12th century. Farnham Castle was built during the 12th century as a residence for the Bishop of Winchester, while other stone castles were constructed in the same period at Bletchingley by the de Clares and at Reigate by the Warennes. During King John‘s struggle with the barons, Magna Carta was issued in June 1215 at Runnymede. In the following year Surrey was overrun by forces supporting Prince Louis of France, who passed through on their way from London to Winchester and back and occupied Guildford and Reigate castles. Guildford Castle later became one of the favourite residences of King Henry III, who considerably expanded the palace there. In 1264, during the baronial revolt against Henry III, the rebel army of Simon de Montfort passed southwards through Surrey on their way to the Battle of Lewes in Sussex. Although the rebels were victorious, soon after the battle royal forces captured and destroyed Bletchingley Castle, whose owner Gilbert de Clare was one of de Montfort’s leading supporters. By the 14th-century castles were of dwindling military importance, but continued to be a mark of social prestige, leading to the construction of castles at Starborough near Lingfield by Lord Cobham and at Betchworth by John Fitzalan, whose father had recently inherited the Earldom of Surrey.

Surrey had little political or economic importance in the Middle Ages. It was not the main power-base of any major aristocratic family or the seat of a bishopric. Its agricultural wealth was limited by its soil varieties. Its forested North Downs and the Wealden plain were of timber, charcoal and hunting use. Population pressure in the 12th and 13th centuries led to the gradual reduction of the Weald, by 1800 a patchy forest. Urban development, excepting the London suburb of Southwark, was sapped by the overshadowing predominance of London and the major towns in neighbouring shires, many of which benefited from access to the sea or from political or ecclesiastical eminence. Significant prosperity focussed in the later Middle Ages here on the production of woollen cloth, England’s main export industry, which in Surrey saw much of its manufacture in Guildford.

One benefit of obscurity was that Surrey largely avoided being seriously fought over in the various rebellions and civil wars of the period, although armies from Kent heading for London passed through what was then north-eastern Surrey during the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381, Cade’s Rebellion in 1450 and one stage of the Wars of the Roses in 1460.

In 1082 a Cluniac abbey was founded at Bermondsey by Alwine, a wealthy English citizen of London. The first Cistercian monastery in England, Waverley Abbey, was founded in 1128. Over the next quarter-century monks spread out from here to found new houses, creating a network of twelve monasteries descended from Waverley across southern and central England. The 12th and early 13th centuries also saw the establishment of Augustinian priories at Merton, Newark, Tandridge, Southwark and Reigate. A Dominican friary was established at Guildford by Henry III’s widow Eleanor of Provence, in memory of her grandson who had died at Guildford in 1274. In the 15th century a Carthusian priory was founded by King Henry V at Sheen. These would all perish, along with the still important Benedictine abbey of Chertsey, in the 16th-century Dissolution of the Monasteries.

Now fallen into disuse, some English counties had nicknames for those raised there such as a ‘tyke’ from Yorkshire, a ‘yellowbelly’ from Lincolnshire and a ‘Surrey capon’, being associated in the later Middle Ages as the county where chickens were fattened up for the London meat markets.

Trusted Cleaners offer the following cleaning services in the following London areas

EC1 | EC2 Bishopsgate | EC3 Fenchurch Street | EC4 Fleet Street | WC1 | WC2 Strand | N1 | N2 East Finchley | N3 Finchley | N4 Finsbury Park | N5 Highbury | N6 Highgate | NW3 Hampstead | W1 | W2 Paddington | W3 Acton | W4 Chiswick | W5 Ealing | W6 Hammersmith | W8 Kensington | W9 Maida Vale | W10 North Kensington | W11 Notting Hill | W12 Shepherds Bush | W13 West Ealing | W14 West Kensington | SE1 | SE2 Abbey Wood | SE3 Blackheath | SW1 | SW2 Brixton | SW3 Chelsea | SW4 Clapham | SW5 Earls Court | SW6 Fulham | SW7 South Kensington | SW8 South Lambeth | SW9 Stockwell | SW10 West Brompton | SW11 Battersea | SW12 Balham | SW13 Barnes | SW14 Mortlake | SW15 Putney | SW16 Streatham | SW17 Tooting | SW18 Wandsworth | SW19 Wimbledon | SW20 West Wimbledon.

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